Lecture Programme

CIAS Autumn/Winter Lecture Programme 2022

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12 Sep 2022
Subject:- The Anatomy of Yorkshires Lead Smelting Mills.

Monday 7.30 pm
Venue:- St. Mary’s Centre, Corporation Road, Middlesbrough.
Speaker:- Richard Lamb

As well as looking at Yorkshires Lead Smelting Mills it will include new information on the history of Grinton Mill unearthed after the flood damage in August 2019.

17 Oct 2022
Subject:- Demolition of the Redcar Steelworks.

Monday 7.30 pm
Venue:- St. Mary’s Centre, Corporation Road, Middlesbrough.
Speaker:- Chris Twigg

Historical images of the demolition of local industrial sites are few and far between, however, the use of drones and social media has generated a vast amount of imagery of the recent demolitions across the Teesworks site. Additional information gathered from planning applications and satellite
imagery allows us to see what happened entirely behind closed doors in previous generations.

26 Nov 2022 – ELGEE MEMORIAL LECTURE
Subject:- Alum : A Forgotten Industry.

Saturday 10.30 am
Venue:- Dorman Museum, Linthorpe Road, Middlesbrough
Speaker:-
Peter Appleton

Once described as “a science-based industry at a time when there was no science on which to base it”, the alum shale industry of north-east Yorkshire existed for about 270 years and spanned the reigns of twelve monarchs, from James I to Victoria. In his lecture, Peter Appleton gives an introduction to the product, its uses, the processes for making it, and the supply and distribution
channels that supported it.

Note: This lecture will only be available in person and will not be available via Zoom.

05 Dec 2022
Subject:- Our Salty Heritage.

Monday 7.30 pm
Venue:- St. Mary’s Centre, Corporation Road, Middlesbrough.
Speaker:- Dr FW (Rick) Smith

Rick, a semi-retired independent geologist, will talk about how the accidental discovery of Zechstein age evaporites below Middlesbrough in 1859 led to large scale mining of salt and anhydrite, which was the foundation of Teesside’s inorganic chemical industry. The formation, extent and exploitation of these remarkable geological deposits will be described by Rick who worked for ICI in the 1970s. The westward limits of anhydrite and gypsum have been explored at Great Stainton, and are proved by unstable ground conditions around Darlington, Bedale and Ripon. Southeastwards the evaporite formations thicken and were thoroughly explored for potash from 1939 into the 1960s, culminating in shaft-sinking at Boulby, Britain’s deepest mine and only potash producer.

23 Jan 2023
Subject:- The Discovery and Exploration of Polyhalite in Yorkshire

Monday 7.30 pm
Venue:- St. Mary’s Centre, Corporation Road, Middlesbrough.
Speaker:- Dr FW (Rick) Smith

Rick will follow on from last month and talk about the discovery of polyhalite in 1939, and the events and characters involved in its definition over the next 70 years. Then the origins in 2010 and the details of the York Potash exploration project will be discussed, along with the parallel decision by Cleveland Potash to commence mining polyhalite in 2016 (the first, and currently only, such mine in the world). Finishing with the planning and development of Sirius Minerals’, now Anglo American’s, world class 20 million tpa Woodsmith Mine at Whitby.

13 Feb 2023
Subject:- Seathwaite Wad Mine

Monday 7.30 pm
Venue:- St. Mary’s Centre, Corporation Road, Middlesbrough.
Speaker:- Mark Hatton

Ever wonder where the phrase “black market” came from? The graphite (or “Wad” or “Plumbago” or “Black Lead”) extracted from the mine at Seathwaite in Borrowdale near Keswick was the purest and finest quality in the World. The graphite was mined from the 15th to the 19th centuries and found many uses, some of which helped make the British Navy the most powerful in the World and saw the finest pencils made in Keswick. The price of this wonder material soared in the 18th and 19th centuries such that it became the most valuable material ever to be mined in Cumbria. Some locals were tempted to steal and illicitly trade the dark coloured graphite, which is reputed to be the origin of this now common expression.

A record of our previous events can be viewed here